SOLID EDGE V19 TUTORIALS PDF

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Basic Solid Edge V19 Tutorial - Free download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online for free. Solid Edge is a trademark or registered trademark of Siemens Product Lifecycle Management. Software Inc. or its subsidiaries in the United States and in other. experience with Solid Edge, please start by working through the tutorials for basic This lesson introduces the Solid Edge Assembly interface and discusses the.


Solid Edge V19 Tutorials Pdf

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Solid Edge V Geometry. Dimensioning . as Solid Edge adds constraints. Not all the needed constraints may be Tutorial - Constraints. √ Start a new Part. Solid Edge V19 for Designers is a textbook written with the tutorial point of view with Part, Assembly, Drafting, and Sheet Metal environments of Solid Edge V19 . (Zipped pdf files), table-of-contents-sld-edgeval (31 KB). Solid Edge Standard Parts Installation (Local or Network). UGS; contains ANSI, DIN, UNI, GB, JIS, GOST norms in Solid Edge V • Standard The open associated HTML or PDF file command displays a HTML or PDF file, typically con-.

Drawing Sketches for Solid Models Chapter 3: Adding Relationships and Dimensions to Sketches Chapter 4: Editing, Extruding, and Revolving the Sketches Chapter 5: Working with Additional Reference Planes Chapter 6: Advanced Modeling Tools-I Chapter 7: Editing Features Chapter 8: Assembly Modeling-I Chapter Assembly Modeling-II Chapter Finish the profile and close the profile view The Select Tool command should still be active.

If required, edit the dimensions so that they match the illustration. The profile is now complete, so on the ribbon bar, click the Return button. Clicking Return closes the profile view and returns you to the 3-D part view.

The Protrusion SmartStep ribbon bar shows that the next step in constructing the basic part shape is projecting the 2-D profile to form a 3-D solid.

Project the profile Position the cursor below the profile you just drew, and notice that projection lines dynamically follow the movement of the cursor. As you move the cursor, the Distance box on the Protrusion SmartStep ribbon bar shows the extent of the profile projection. Position the cursor below the profile, as shown above, and click to finish defining the extent. Notice that when you clicked the Finish button, that the profile elements, including the dimensions and relationships are automatically hidden for you.

You have completed the base feature. Save the part On the File pull down menu, click the Save As button to save the work you have done so far in a file called Tutorial.

Basic Solid Edge V19 Tutorial

Notice that a Protrusion 1 entry has been added to the Feature PathFinder tab. You can use the Feature Pathfinder tab to help you evaluate and edit the models you create in Solid Edge. Round the edges You will use the Round command to round five edges of the part, as shown in the illustration.

With this option, the command lets you select edges and corners to be rounded. Select an edge to round Move the cursor slowly over the model, and notice how the edges of the model highlight.

Position the cursor exactly over the vertex shown circled in the illustration below, stop moving the mouse for a moment, and notice that the cursor image changes to indicate that multiple selections are available. Click the right mouse button, and the QuickPick tool is displayed. Move the cursor over the different entries in QuickPick, and notice that different edges of the model highlight.

QuickPick allows you to select exactly the edge you want, the first time, without having to reject unwanted edges. Use QuickPick to highlight the edge shown in the illustration, and then click the left mouse button to select it.

Select another edge to round Position the cursor over the edge at the location shown in the illustration below. Notice that the edge highlights, but QuickPick is not displayed. No other edges are near the cursor, so the system recognizes that QuickPick is not necessary for you to select the edge you want.

Click to select the edge. Selecting the remaining edges to round Select the additional edges shown in the illustration.

The part should resemble the illustration below. Notice that the rounds are removed, the edges you rounded are shown highlighted, and the ribbon bar expands so that you can change the Select option and the radius.

You can now edit any of the steps taken to create the rounds. If you selected the wrong edges to round, click the Cancel button on the ribbon bar; this clears all the selected edges so that you can select new edges. When you are finished editing the round, click the Preview button again.

Save the part On the Main toolbar, click the Save button to save the work you have done so far. Construct a thin wall The base feature and rounded edges have defined the general shape of the finished part. The next step is to hollow out the interior, as shown. You will use the Thin Wall command to do this. On the Features toolbar, click the Thinwall button from the flyout. Select the first face to leave open When constructing thin wall features, you typically also specify faces you want to leave open.

For this feature, you will select the front and top faces of the part. Position the cursor over the face shown in the illustration below.

If the face shown highlights, click the left mouse button to select it. If a different face highlights, use QuickPick to select the face shown in the illustration.

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If the element you want to select is highlighted, you can bypass QuickPick and select the element directly using the left mouse button. This tells the system that you are done selecting open faces. Your part should look like the illustration below. Finish the thin wall If the part does not look like the illustration above, you can use the Thin Wall SmartStep ribbon bar to edit any of the steps you took to create the thin wall. If the thickness of your part looks different than the illustration, click the Common Thickness step on the SmartStep ribbon bar and make sure that the thickness is set to 8 mm.

If the open faces on your part look different than the illustration, click the Open Faces step on the SmartStep ribbon bar, click the Cancel button to clear the selected faces, and then select the faces again. When you are satisfied with the appearance of your part, click Finish.

Construct a protrusion You will construct a mounting tab on the part, as shown in the illustration. You will use the Protrusion command for this.

Create a parallel reference plane The first step in constructing this feature is selecting a profile plane to draw the shape of the protrusion on.

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However, there are no reference planes at the location where you will construct the feature. So you need to create a reference plane parallel to an existing face or reference plane. Select the top reference plane, as shown in the illustration.

Remember that you can use QuickPick to help you select the reference plane. Notice that, by moving the cursor around the top face of the part, you can position the parallel reference plane inside or outside the part. Move the cursor to position the reference plane inside the part, as shown, and then click. Evaluate the profile In the next few steps, you will draw and dimension the profile for the mounting tab, as shown in the illustration below.

You will use the Line command to draw the three lines shown. You will use the SmartDimension command to define the 30 mm and 35 mm dimensions.

You will use the Distance Between command to define the 36 mm dimension. Position the cursor as shown in the illustration above, hold the left mouse button down, then drag the cursor to reposition the geometry to the center of the view, as shown below. Click the right mouse button to exit the Pan command. Start the first line On the Draw toolbar, click the Line button from the flyout. Position the cursor as shown in the illustration below, and when the point on element relationship indicator displays adjacent to the cursor, click to start the line.

Move the cursor to the right. Notice the following: A line stretches to follow the cursor wherever you move it. When the line is nearly horizontal, a horizontal relationship indicator displayed next to the cursor. Finish the first line Move the cursor until: The horizontal relationship indicator 2. The length displayed on the ribbon bar is approximately 35 mm. The angle on the ribbon bar is zero degrees. When the line is horizontal, and approximately 35 mm long, click to finish the first line.

Draw the second line By typing the length and angle on the ribbon bar, you can draw lines the exact length and angle you want.

If it is not already highlighted in blue, click the Length box on the ribbon bar. The Line command is still active, so the next line will start at the endpoint of the line you just drew. Notice that the Length box updates and the Angle box becomes active. Move the cursor around the screen and notice that the line length is locked at 30 mm.

Move the cursor down until the vertical relationship indicator is displayed. Notice that the line angle locks at degrees. Click to place the second line. When you know the length or angle you want, you can type exact values in the ribbon bar.

Position the cursor as shown in the illustration above, and when the point on element and horizontal relationship indicators display adjacent to the cursor, click to finish the line. In addition to the horizontal, vertical, and end-point connect relationship you learned about earlier, two point on element relationships A and B were used for this profile.

The point on element relationships connect the horizontal lines you drew to the vertical edge on the part, but the horizontal lines are still free to move up and down. In the next few steps, you will use dimensions to finish defining the size and position of the profile elements. Dimension the vertical line On the Draw toolbar, click the SmartDimension button.

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Position the cursor over the vertical line you just drew, as shown in the illustration below. Move the cursor to the right, as shown in the following illustration, then click to define the dimension location.

Dimension the horizontal line The SmartDimension command should still be active. Position the cursor over the horizontal line, as shown in the illustration below. Move the cursor above the profile, as shown in the following illustration, then click to define the dimension location. The dimension value of this line may not be exactly 35 mm, because you approximated the length of the line when drawing it. Select the Distance Between command You have finished defining the size of the profile.

One more dimension, as shown, will define location of the profile on the part. On the Draw toolbar, select the Distance Between button from the flyout.

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Select the elements to dimension Position the cursor over the edge of the part, as shown in the following illustration. When the edge highlights, click. If QuickPick displays, either QuickPick selection is valid. There are two edges available in this situation. When the line highlights, click.

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Define the dimension orientation Move the cursor around the screen and notice that the dimension orientation changes to indicate that multiple solutions are available. Position the cursor, as shown in the following illustration, and click to position the dimension. Close the profile view The profile is now complete, so on the ribbon bar, click the Return button to return to the 3-D model view. Specify the material direction On the View menu, click Fit to fit the part in the window.

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Enhancements have also been made to trimming and extending surfaces. New functionality includes the Redefine Surface command that allows you to replace existing surfaces with a single editable BlueSurf, particularly useful for imported geometry.

Reflective Display allows you to inspect the form of a model without having to mirror geometry. You will also learn about the enhancements to the Surface Visualisation and Rendering Tools, and more.

This session covers the new emboss functionality that allows one tool body to stamp or emboss a target body. Other new functionality includes the creation of beads, dimples, drawn cutouts and louvers across bends. Sheet metal features can now be placed on regular ordered parts of uniform thickness without having to convert the part to sheet metal.

You will also learn about many other enhancements. This first assembly session covers enhancements to PathFinder Indicators making it easier to locate parts within an assembly. There are also many new options and improvements to Create Part In-Place. New functionality within the area of assembly Inter Part modelling includes creating Sheet Metal Tabs within the assembly environment, in addition to peer part geometry enhancements.The features you selected are copied and mirrored to the other side of the part.

In the next step, you will select a reference plane on which you will draw the profile. Position the cursor over the vertical line on the rectangle, as shown in the following illustration.

Select a feature to edit On the Features toolbar, click the Select Tool button. The dimension value of this line may not be exactly 35 mm, because you approximated the length of the line when drawing it. This also helps build stability and predictability into your models. Position the cursor over the millimeter dimension, and click to select it. In addition to the horizontal, vertical, and end-point connect relationship you learned about earlier, two point on element relationships A and B were used for this profile.