OXFORD WORD SKILLS IDIOMS AND PHRASAL VERBS PDF

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Oxford Word Skills Idioms And Phrasal Verbs Pdf

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Download Oxford Words Skills Idioms and Phrasal Verbs Intermediate (PDF), a very useful book to improve your idioms, phrasal verbs, and. Oxford Word Skills Idioms and Phrasal Verbs: Intermediate, Advanced. | ISBN: | PDF | pages | 18 MB. | ISBN means 'look at' replaces the key verb in a menu box. A taboo (see Labels below). Oxford. Phrasal Complete Phrasal Verbs List Phrasal Verb Meaning.

TV having influence regret. Out She recovered quickly from the operation and now she's Everyday life 43 16 I can talk about study I wasn't very good at English when I started, but it wasn't for want of trying. I worked really hard night after night. My teacher says It's all part of the learning process.

I hope she's right. DEZI For a long time I did next to nothing, until my teacher told me one day that ifI didn't pull my socks up, I'd fail my English exams and then I'd have nothing to show for th ree or four years' studying. So, I decided to turn over a new leaf. I really began to apply myself, and I'm pleased to say I've just passed my university exams with flying colours.

My teacher's always telling me off for this, and says I should check my v"ork carefully as a matter of routine. She's right, because ifI don't cut out the errors, I'll be marked down in the next exam. My English came on in leaps and bounds as a result. If you can't make head or tail of sth INF, you are completely confused by it. You can also say that something goes over your head if you don't understand it.

Frequently bought together

Everyday life. INF used to tell sb that they are not doing well and must work harder. INF talk angrily to sb for doing sth wrong. Write P or U. I'll have to pull my socks up. My English is coming on.

I've cut out the errors. My pronunciation is holding me back. I passed with flying colours. The grammar goes over my head. My son has turned over a new leaf. If you sweep something under the carpet, you try to keep something secret; and if you put someone in the picture. As these examples illustrate. Phrasal verbs consist of two and occasionally three words: a base verb and at least one particle preposition or adverb. Many phrasal verbs are idiomatic: in other words, the meaning of the verb and particle is different from the base verb on its own.

For example, the meanings of give up and give in are quite different from the meaning of give. As with idioms. In other words. Putting idioms and phrasal verbs together has a linguistic rationale, but perhaps an even greater pedagogic one.

A relatively short passage of text - a practical necessity in most language-teaching materials - does not normally produce nine or ten naturally occurring phrasal verbs, but it can easily yield that number if the target language includes both phrasal verbs and idioms.

This makes it easier to present the target language in continuous text rather than disconnected sentences. Introduction 5 Which idioms and phrasal verbs are included? When people think of idioms.

These vivid expressions can be extremely difficult to understand. It is also undeniably true that idiomsespecially the more vivid ones - hold a particular fascination for some learners.

However, there are thousands of idioms. Here are some typical examples: bear sth in mind. I thought as much. Some of these will appear so mundane that they often pass unnoticed as idioms. In some cases the meaning may be quite easy to guess. In both books. To this end. One final note on selection. Dictionaries do not always agree on what constitutes an idiom: hold the line is listed as an idiom in one dictionary. The same is true for under the influence. New idioms and phrasal verbs are presented through different types of text.

The meaning of the new vocabulary is explained in an accompanying glossary unless it is illustrated in visuals or diagrams. Important or additional information'is included in the 'spotlight' boxes. The material has been designed so that students can cover the new vocabulary and look at the meaning, or vice-versa. This is a simple, quick, and easy way for learners to test themselves over and over again, so there is no pressure on you to keep searching for different exercises.

This indicates a personalized exercise which gives learners an opportunity to use the new vocabulary within the context of their own lives.

Students can write answers to these in their notebooks, but they make ideal pair-work activities for learners to practise their spoken English while using the new vocabulary.

You and your students should find this interesting. How can students study alone? You don't need to do the units in any particular order.

Look at the idioms and phrasal verbs in the glossaries and tables, and cover the meanings. See if you can remember the meanings.

You can do this when you have finished the exercises, or several days later as a way of revising the idioms and phrasal verbs. Firstly, spend at least ten minutes studying the presentation, which may be a text, a dialogue, a table, etc. Use the glossaries to help you understand the meaning of new items. Practise saying the idioms and phrasal verbs a few times to help you remember them. If you are using a bilingual dictionary, you could also add a translation.

Check your answers in the answer key on pages J This gives you an opportunity to use the vocabulary more freely to write in your notebook about yourself, your , country, etc. Either do them immediately after a unit, or do them a few days later as a form of revision.

You may also be interested in two specialist dictionaries: Oxford Idioms Dictionary for learners of English and Oxford Phrasal Verbs Dictionary for learners of English.

The situation is improving, but we're not out of the woods yet. I'll probably take a back seat and let Marco do most of the work. Idioms are particularly common in spoken English. Some are easier to understand, but you will need to learn many of them as fixed phrases. Having said that, the food is very good: ' I thought as much: Glossary having said that the next thing I knew I thought as much used to say that sth is true despite what you have just said.

The glossaries and tables in this book will also show you that some idioms have a choice of words or a particular style.

Explore the Cambridge Dictionary

See Units for more on style. Idiom Meaning Special feature Will they lose? She can't do the gardening. I'd be hard pressed to name all a choice of synonyms: the countries in Europe.

I think Ann got out of bed on the wrong side this morning. When you read a text, look for possible idioms and check in a good dictionary to see if you are right. I asked Sue about her essay and she just ignored me. Oh dear. I put my foot in it, then.

She didn't do a stroke of work, so don't take it personally. She'll just have to work harder next time. Glossary a sore point sth that makes you upset, angry, or embarrassed when sb mentions it. Then underline the full idioms. Is Karen still upset about you taking her dress? My brother hasn't done a of work all day; he's so lazy. The seat collapsed under me, and the next I knew, I was on the floor.

You didn't say that I was upset with her, did you? New York is incredibly exciting. I was than happy to help, but she wanted to do it on her own.

We'll be hard to finish this work by the end of the day. Sam lost the race. He looked very dejected. They made Mandy repeat the test. It her right for trying to cheat. Donna wasn't very nice to me.

She's just in a bad mood. Write at the end, or in your notebook. CouLct ClLs. It won't be easy; you've just got to hang on in there. If my memory serves me correctly, the first moon landing was in My sister's just bought a new car. Basically, it's just keeping up with the Joneses. He's unreliable at the best of times, but forgetting my birthday was the last straw. You may rest assured that we will do everything we can to help. On the first morning we met our instructor, Kevin, and he made it clear we were going to hit the ground running.

We had to build a raft and then sail it down a river; he said it would sort out the sheep from the goats. That made me feel very uneasy, but I put a brave face on it. The next day was even worse - abseiling down a cliff - but I was determined not to throw in the towel. By the third day I was beginning to realize we were all in the same boat, and probably all feeling equally vulnerable.

I survived. Underline them. For example, somebody can be in the driving seat of a vehicle , which means they are literally in control of the vehicle. When we use the phrase metaphorically, we mean the person is in control of a situation.

Other examples are: They've decided to wait for the dust to settle. I'm sure we're on the right track. Abbreviations The following abbreviations are used: N noun sth something v verb sb somebody ADJ adjective etc. You use 'etc. SYN synonym i. The situation is improving, but we're not out of not out of the woods INF not yet free from the woods yet.

I'll probably take a back seat and let Marco do take a back seat deliberately become less actively most of the work. My heart sank when I saw the hotel room my heart sank used to tell sb that you suddenly felt they'd given us. Idioms are particularly common in spoken English. Some are easier to understand, but you will need to learn many of them as fixed phrases.

Having said that, the food is very good: I thought as much: Glossary having said that used to say that sth is true despite what you have just said. I thought as much used to say you are not surprised that sth is true. The glossaries and tables in this book will also show you that some idioms have a choice of words or a particular style. See Units for more on style.

Idiom Meaning Special feature Will they lose? She can't do the gardening. I'd be hard pressed to name all find it very difficult a choice of synonyms: When you read a text, look for possible idioms and check in a good dictionary to see if you are right. I asked Sue about her essay and she just ignored me. Oh dear. I put my foot in it, then. She didn't do a stroke of work, so don't take it personally. She'll just have to work harder next time. Glossary a sore point sth that makes you upset, angry, or embarrassed when sb mentions it.

Complete the sentences with words from the box. Then underline the full idioms. S New York is incredibly exciting. He looked very dejected. It her right for trying to cheat. She's just in a bad mood. Write at the end, or in your notebook. CouLct ClLs. Basically, it's just keeping up with the Joneses. S You may rest assured that we will do everything we can to help.

On the first morning we met our instructor, Kevin, and he made it clear we were going to hit the ground running. We had to build a raft and then sail it down a river; he said it would sort out the sheep from the goats.

That made me feel very uneasy, but I put a brave face on it. The next day was even worse - abseiling down a cliff - but I was determined not to throw in the towel. By the third day I was beginning to realize we were all in the same boat, and probably all feeling equally vulnerable. I survived. Underline them. For example, somebody can be in the driving seat of a vehicle , which means they are literally in control of the vehicle.

When we use the phrase metaphorically, we mean the person is in control of a situation. Other examples are: They've decided to wait for Literal meaning: Metaphorical meaning: I'm sure we're on the right Literal meaning: Metaphors from particular areas of activity can sometimes describe particular thoughts, ideas, etc. For example, boxing expressions often describe people in difficult situations: The minister is on the ropes now.

The boss found himself in a tight corner. Idioms derived from card games are sometimes connected to keeping plans and ideas hidden. She plays her cards close to her chest. I think he's got something up his sleeve. For example, in the past a blacksmith was a person who made things out of iron. If a boy wanted to fight, he would put a piece of wood on his shoulder; he fought against the first person who knocked the piece of wood off. I think she's still got something up her 3 That boy has a on his shoulder about his height.

I don't know why it bothers him. S After the recent criticism, I think she's in quite a tight 6 I don't understand why he always plays his cards so close to his 2 Rephrase these situations using a suitable idiom. S The company is doing badly and is likely to fail. And what is the meaning of the final idiom? Put them in the correct column below. S make sb less confident by saying or doing sth unexpected. Eat up your supper. Some particles create a new meaning, but still with a connection to the base verb: Lets eat in this evening.

Some particles change the meaning of the base verb from literal to figurative: These big bills are eating into my savings. We got up early to watch the sun come up. Many phrasal verbs are transitive, i. Transitive phrasal verbs are of two types: With separable phrasal verbs, the object can usually go before or after the particle; with inseparable phrasal verbs, the object must go after the particle.

Dictionaries often show the difference like this: This shows you that the object can go before or after 'up': Don't tear up the letter. I Don't tear the letter up. But note that, if the object is a pronoun, it must go between the verb and particle: Don't tear it up.

NOT Don't tear up it. There are also a small number of phrasal verbs where the object always goes before the particle: I showed the students around the school. NOT I shO'lved around the students. This shows you that the object cannot go between 'take' and 'against'; it must go after the particle: He took against Sam after that. NOT He took Sam against. The plane put down in a field. Don't put yourself down so much! I put my name down for the day trip to put 5b I 5b'5 name down for 5th write sb's name on a list so the seaside.

I put her anger down to stress. I put it down for I to poor management. The helicopter put down near the river means 'the helicopter near the river: Underline the phrasal verb and its object. Check your answers on page before you do Exercise S. Nouns formed from phrasal verbs may be hyphenated, e. Police are interviewing passers-by who witnessed the breakout at Hyde Prison last night.

IThe government has been forced into a climbdown after the revelations of a cover-up I 1here was a sharp intake of breath from the public gallery during the judges summing-up Following the outbreak of violence, the police have requested backup from the army.

Glossary '. A bystander is someone who watches what is happening, e. SYNS onlooker, look on v. Will there 7 2 Did the police cover up the facts? We 4 Someone broke out of prison last night. The 6 Will the team back us up? S The party was really boring; we made a quick and went to a club instead. Write Tor F. No, they 2 Is Bess having a rest? Yeah, that was a long walk. She's completely 3 The article isn't as strongly worded as it was. No, it's been 4 What's for dinner? I think there are some from lunchtime.

S She coughed throughout your performance. I know, I found it really. They were unhappy with the way things were. That's right; he has often 8 Have the discussions come to an end yet? Introduct ion to idioms and phrasal verbs Unit ,.

The letters in the grey squares spell out an expression. What is it? The expression in the grey squares is Unit 2 1 Match with a-j.

S It's nothing personal: I think we're on the wrong g sails. S I occasionally let my rule my 6 If someone criticizes me, I tend to take it to 3 Are the sentences in the questionnaire in Exercise 2 true about you, sometimes true, or not true? Write your answers, or talk to another student. Who put you up? I can't work out what 2 Rewrite the part of the sentence in italics, using a phrasal verb that keeps a similar meaning.

Make any other additions that are necessary. S We had to have our dog killed. Unit 4 1 What related phrasal nouns and adjectives are formed from these phrasal verbs? Write them in the correct column below. He's finished. Ex-army major, loves the sound of his own voice; doesn't suffer fools gladly. Very protective of daughter, AlIce. Alice Beck: Attractive and charming on the surface, Alice likes to play it cool with men, but deep down, she's qUIte shy.

Loves her father, but very much under his thumb. Gideon's wife. Has a quick temper; friends think she's mad as a hatter. Neighbour, in love with Alice. Sadly, thick as two short planks. OPP deep down. He's mad keen on Alice. I was hopping mad. It just doesn't look that way on the surface I top. S She's a very dominant woman; she certainly has her husband under her finger I thumb.

In other words, he's mad. In other words, he's thick as 3 Ella didn't show Luis her true feelings. In other words, she played 4 Ana adores horse-riding. In other words, she's it. S Don just talks and never listens. In other words, he loves the sound of his 6 I love Caz, but she's crazy. In other words, she's mad 7 Mona does everything Pete tells her to.

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In other words, she's under 8 Grandad can put up with anything. Most of the group are very quiet - we need a a live wire a person who is lively and full of energy live wire like Jez to get us talking. We could do with a bright spark here to bring a bright spark INF 1 a lively and intelligent person.

Some bright spark left the door unlocked! How stupid. She always asks Dad for help with cash because a soft touch INF a person from whom you can easily she knows he's a soft touch.

I don't know if Ash would be right for the job; an unknown quantity a person or thing whose he's a bit of an unknown quantity. Mrs Andrews runs the business and people the salt of the earth a good, reliable, honest person. He's tough, ambitious, and he's nobody's fool- nobody's fool a person who is too clever to be he's our best hope as a manager.

SYN no fool. I hate dealing with Rupert; he's a nasty piece a nasty piece of work a person who is unpleasant, of work. He's a bit of a cold fish. Write P or N. Then circle the full idioms. Andy Cracker 1S a great boss: He's a real family man too and he adores his kids.

They only have to ask for something and they get it; he's a 2 touch. Mrs Bolton's been here for years and she's now approaching retirement. She's the salt of the 3 , and will do anything for Andy. But things have to be done in a particular way - 'Mrs Bolton's Way'; she's a 4 of habit. Mandy O'Neill is new in this department. She used to be in sales, and my friend Sally says she's a bright 6 and 7 fool. I'll reserve judgement on her till I get to know her better.

Tim Richards - What can I say? I just can't stand him. I don't trust him at all; I think he's a nasty 8 , actually. Write in your notebook, or talk to another student.

Well, ours has all the qualities. When things went wrong and Dad left us, Mum went to great lengths to hold the family together. She was always there for us, but trusted us to make our own decisions. When we needed a shoulder to cry on , it was Mum we turned to , not our friends. But what sets her apart from the other mums is her concern for others. She's always giving someone or other a helping hand. We thank our lucky stars that she's our mum!

Patti , 16 have sb's best interests at heart care about sb and want to improve their situation. S Dad always makes a special effort to keep them amused. She thinks she can twist me round her little finger, but she can't! He'd walk all over my parents ifhe had the chance. It took me years to learn to stick up for myself. Ifit weren't for me, her room would be disgusting!

Also take sb for granted be so accustomed to sb that you don't appreciate them. If you can twist sb round your little finger INF, you can persuade them to do anything you want. If you get round sb, you persuade them to do what you want, often by being nice to them. If you win sb over, you get their support by persuading them you are right. S If you have things all your own way, you do what everyone else wants. It's not fair! S U's only nice to me because she wants my help. Don't let things like finance or hou sehold chores drive a wedge between you.

Remember that things said in the heat of the moment can be hard to forgive later. On the other hand, if you walk away, you may be storing up problems for the future. My advice is: You'll need to give each other space in the marriage. Glossary be made for each other INF be perfect partners. Write G or B. Do you agree with all the points? You're free - nothing's holding you back and no one's nagging you because the dishes are piling up in the sink. You can do as you please any time, day or night.

RUDY Not for me. I'm bored and lonely. Yes, you answer to no one, but I'd far sooner be in a loving relationship. I'd give anything to meet the right person.

Now that I've finished with him, the thought of going through the same thing again doesn't bear thinking about. I don't want another distressing break-up.

Glossary hold sb back stop sb being as successful as they should be. SYN please yourself. I'd give anything to meet her. I'd give my right arm to have Anya back.

OPP Her boyfriend 2 I don't have to explain my actions to my boss. OPP I have to 3 There's less and less work. OPP I've just 5 He didn't stand in the way of my success. OPP She 5 Complete the texts with one word in each case. Then underline the full idioms, phrasal verbs, or phrasal nouns. Danny was quite possessive, so when I 1 with him, I was relieved that at last I could do 2 I pleased.

But not long after the 3 of the relationship I was terrIbly lonely, and I regretted what Id done. Now Id give 4 to have him back. I feel guilty about Donna. I know I 5 her down badly, and I'm sure she was sick of me 6 her about.

But the truth is, Id far 7 be Single and be able to please 8 in what I do. And getting married just doesn't 9 thinking about; I'm far too selfish. I'm sure there's a little sign above my head that says, 'I want to get married'! Id give my right 10 to meet Mr Right! Or do you have a different point of view? What is it about your own flesh and blood? I've got two sisters. They used to fight like cat and dog when they were kids, and there's little love lost between them now.

But as soon as an outsider criticizes either of them, they immediately close ranks and turn on them. It's a bit the same with me and my wife. When we're together we argue, but when we're apart, we're miserable as sin. How do you account for that? I guess living on top of each other doesn't help, and I'm sure we take each other for granted a lot of the time.

But families are strange! He gets commission on top of his salary. The books were piled on top of one another. S His surname's different from his brother's.

How do you explain that? If so, why? S Have any members of your family ever turned you? If so, who? The firstborn often gets the most attention and is put on a pedestal; the last to be born is the baby and tends to get away with murder. Some studies have backed this up, suggestIng that middle children who feel left out may distance themselves from others and become loners.

It is important, therefore, that parents make a point of lavishing attention on the middle child and praising their achievements.

Tài liệu Oxford word skills idioms and phrasal verbs advanced

Glossary, result in sth cause a particular situation to happen. Where does it go? Write it at the end. It's true that the firstborn IS put on a 1 and the third child gets away WIth 2 but in my case it didn't 3 In me becoming an underachiever. Quite the opposite. I made a 4 of ensuring that I wasn't squeezed 5 or 6 of attention. In fact, I craved attention and fought really hard to excel In everything. I became an overachiever.

Now, I don't feel left 7 by my parents. We have a very good relationship and I feel they 8 me up in everythIng I do. Mind you, they still 9 more attention on my younger sister than me.

But I don't mind that now. If so, is there any truth in what the text says? One minute I'm on top of the world, the next I'm at the end of my tether, or crying my eyes out at some silly romantic movie. I'm so short-tempered - the slightest thing winds me up. A guy in the office was tapping on the radiator earlier, and I just went off the deep end and screamed my head off at him.

Poor man - I have since apologized. Pregnancy has stirred up feelings I didn't know existed! It's such a new experience; I guess I just need time to take it all in. Glossary for no apparent reason without an obvious cause. SYN at your wits' end.

The meaning must stay the same. TAKE 2 The boy was making a lot of noise. HEAD 3 She couldn't stop crying. DEEP 6 The news made everyone angry. STIR 7 Please don't make her angry. WIND 8 I'm feeling extremely happy. Then write your answers in your notebook, or talk to another student.

So, first I spend time alone with her, sides. I try to involve both parties in the dispute, cooling her down, then I bring in whoever she but ensure that I keep any meeting on an even has upset. It's a stressful job, and I have to keep my keel. That's easier said than done, especially if emotions in check.

When I go home, I can pour my they're dying to have a go at each other. Someone heart out to my husband: SYN calm sb down. I'm on your side in this matter.

She always sides with my brother. She rubs. He poured said on this issue. Don't take sides the wrong way. I He must keep up outto me. Whose me up. That's easier his heart a coffee. Don't bottle for are you on? I'm dying his anger your feelings. Then circle the full idioms and phrasal verbs. He's incredibly upset. She dealt the cards out. She stuck her tongue out.

He zipped his jacket up.

He doubled up in pain also be She took the skirt up. SYN double over. We propped the tree up. I screwed the letter up. She curled up on the sofa. I mopped up the spilt milk. Some of these phrasal verbs also have figurative meanings.

Example Meaning The business is in a bad state; we'll have to roll roll your sleeves up start doing a difficult or our sleeves up and get on with it. Judge Wallis dealt out tough penalties for people deal 5th out give a punishment to a person or driving without a licence.

SYN hand 5th out. The new Italian Prime Minister took up his post take 5th up start a new job or have a new at the weekend. The government is propping up the ailing car prop 5th up support sth that is in difficulty. Do you agree with that? SYN shore 5th up. When she sang, we curled up with curl up INF become very embarrassed. We just have a few things to mop up before mop 5th up complete or end sth by dealing with a signing the contracts.

S When you've rolled up the rug, it'll need hoovering D it can go in the lorry D. S If you screw up an exam, it means you make a mess of it. Write it in. What bad manners! S a The judge decided to out a heavy sentence for the robbery. I've hurt my hand. I hope I can 2 We need to see all the photos at the same time, so you'll need to 3 This skirt's too short, but it's easy enough to 4 That document's really important - why on earth did you S There's a lot of work to be done, so it's time to 6 There's a lot of water on the floor.

Could you 7 He was so weak he kept falling over. People Unit 5 1 Read the text, then answer the questions. It will be hot, difficult, and you're not sure what to expect. You need people with imtiative, who will also work well as a team. Which four would you choose and why? And why wouldn't you choose the other six? Keep a similar meaning.My English came on in leaps and bounds as a result. Dictionaries often show the difference like this:. Do you fancy going to the pizza place, or shall we just eat into Iin as usual?

I hope she's right. The situation is improving, but we're not out of the woods yet.